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Diz Runs With… Anders Brooker


Today, I’m running with Anders Brooker, who is the race director for the Missoula Marathon in Missoula, Montana. The race weekend consists of a 5k, Half, Full, kid’s marathon, and beer run, so there is an event available for everyone.

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While running with Anders, we obviously talked about the Missoula Marathon but that’s not the only thing we covered. Among the highlights of our run:

  • A recent 50 mile run he wasn’t exactly prepared for
  • Why the race is run in July
  • Why the race has a participant cap
  • Being named The Best Marathon in the United States by Runner’s World in 2010
  • Things to do in Missoula in addition to running 26.2 miles

There are very few races that are on my list of “Races I WILL run on my pursuit of the 50 state club“, but after talking to Anders I’m pretty sure that Missoula is now on the list. Everything about this race sounds like my idea of a perfect race, from the number of runners to the rural environment to the small town feel. I look forward to taking a week or so, and really exploring a part of the country that I’ve never been to before, and running a great race as well.

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If you’re as interested in more information about the Missoula Marathon, make sure you check out their website.

And you can also stay up to date by liking the Missoula Marathon on Facebook or follow the Missoula Marathon on Twitter. (@mslamarathon)

Join my Tribe!

There’s always room for more members of the tribe!

Both the Facebook group and the newsletter provide opportunities that can’t be found anywhere else. You can interact with fellow tribe members on the Facebook group, and stay up to date with future guests on the show via the newsletter, as well as getting some other freebies and offers that aren’t available anywhere else.

If you’ve got questions about either/both, just let me know!


Diz Runs With… Bart Yasso


In today’s episode of Diz Runs With, I’m joining a one of the more iconic figures within the running community for a few easy miles, the Mayor of Running himself, Mr. Bart Yasso.

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As the Chief Running Officer for Runner’s World magazine, Bart has literally been around the world running events of all distances and has even finished a race on each of the 7 continents.

Over the course of our run, our conversation covered a variety of topics. Here are a few of the highlights:

  • Trail running vs. road running.
  • The inspiration that mid-pack and back of the pack runners provide.
  • The increasing number of women runners.
  • The pros and cons of traveling to races almost every week.
  • How Lyme Disease altered Bart’s running career.
  • Running a 56 mile marathon.

If you’d like to connect with Bart, here are the best places to do so.

Website-BartYasso.com

Twitter-@bartyasso

Facebook-Bart Yasso

 

Join my Tribe!

There’s always room for more members of the tribe!

Both the Facebook group and the newsletter provide opportunities that can’t be found anywhere else. You can interact with fellow tribe members on the Facebook group, and stay up to date with future guests on the show via the newsletter, as well as getting some other freebies and offers that aren’t available anywhere else.

If you’ve got questions about either/both, just let me know!

Diz Runs With… Mick Jurynec


On today’s episode of the Diz Runs With podcast, I am running with ultra-marathoner Mick Jurynec.

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Mick is a fantastic guy, and while our conversation seemed to revolve mostly around running really long distances, we did cover a few other areas as well.

Some of the highlights of our conversation include:

Overdressed?

Overdressed?

 

  • The process of going from a non-runner to an ultra-runner.
  • Dressing for a winter run when it’s 90* outside.
  • The most important component of running really long distances while avoiding injury.
  • The give and take of training for a long distance race while being married to an ultra-runner and having a young child at the same time, all while still working full time.
  • The joys of running in nature and the rush of being chased by a moose!

And these are just a sampling of the turns our conversation took. You’ll want to hear the moose story for sure, it’s fantastic!

If you’d like to connect with Mick to learn more about his ultra-marathon adventures or to compare stories about ornery moose chasing you through the woods, here are some of the places you can find him.

Twitter-@mjurynec

Facebook-Altra Runner

Website- Miracle in the Wasatch

 

Join my Tribe!

There’s always room for more members of the tribe!

Both the Facebook group and the newsletter provide opportunities that can’t be found anywhere else. You can interact with fellow tribe members on the Facebook group, and stay up to date with future guests on the show via the newsletter, as well as getting some other freebies and offers that aren’t available anywhere else.

If you’ve got questions about either/both, just let me know!


Strength Training & Runners

Runners are a funky bunch.

Image by Gamma Man via Flickr

Image by Gamma Man via Flickr

We have this thought in our minds that if we want to run longer races or get faster, we need to run more and run faster.

But we tend to forget one of the most important components of running farther and faster–strength training.

Runners Need Regular Strength Training

I don’t care what kind of race you’re running–from 5k all the way up to 100 miles–strength training needs to be a regular part of your routine.

At least it needs to if you want to get faster or run farther.

And strength training is a good way to avoid the injury bug as well.

Why Don’t More Runners Lift Weights?

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There are a number of reasons that many non-professional runners neglect lifting weights. But if you talk to most professional runners, no matter what distances they run, regular strength training sessions are just as important as logging their prescribed amount of miles.

The reasons that we skip strength training are many, but here are a few–

  • “I Don’t Want to Get Too Big”–This is an excuse used by many female runners, as well as some men. The thought behind this excuse is that by adding muscle size, it will actually get more difficult to run because you will have to carry around more weight. While this makes some sense logically, the fact is that if you are training properly you won’t add muscle mass, just strength and stamina. You know, the things that help you in the last third of your race.
  • “Strength Training Won’t Help Me Run Faster”–This excuse is shortsighted. In truth, just lifting weights won’t help you run faster. But by building up the strength of the muscles that you use to run, you will be able to train harder and run longer without tiring, both of which will help you improve your race times.
  • “I Don’t Have Time”–To be blunt, yes you do. You see, you don’t need to add 2-3 strength training workouts to your busy schedule to see the results. Instead, 2-3 15-20 minute sessions after a hard workout is enough to help you improve running economy, finishing kick, and stay injury free.
  • “I’ve Never Done Strength Training Before. Why Start Now?”–Seriously? We used to think the world was flat, that smoking cigarettes was safe, and that processed food was both convenient and nutritious. Just because you’ve always done something one way doesn’t mean it’s the only way or the best way. Give strength training a try, and see what happens.

There are so many reasons that strength training is important for runners of all speeds, sizes, and mileage levels that there really isn’t any good reason that you’re still putting off regular strength training.

But if you’re still not convinced, I’d love to know what is holding you back. Shoot me a message, and let’s have a conversation.

And make sure you check my next post, when I’ll be going over some of the many benefits of regular strength training in much more detail.

Blue Ridge Marathon–Been There, Run That!

This past weekend, I headed up to Roanoke, VA, to run in the mountains for the Blue Ridge Marathon.

While the trip was a blur (flight up Friday afternoon, race Saturday morning, fly home Saturday evening), I think I might have developed a little crush on the city of Roanoke and really want to head back for a longer visit soon. If you’ve never been in that part of the country, I can’t encourage you enough to go for a visit.

The race was advertised as the “Toughest Road Marathon in America”, and while I haven’t run every road race in the country (yet!) I can’t imagine finding one that is more difficult than this one.

I knew before the race started that the hills (let’s be honest, mountains) were going to be a challenge. I mean, living in Florida means we run on flat ground only. Sure, we have a couple of “hills”, and we can always run the overpasses, but we basically only run on flat surfaces.

And the only surfaces we didn’t run in Roanoke were flat.

Oy vey….

The race started out with a bit of a climb. And by a bit, I mean 7 miles. Straight up.

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Not Even Half Way Up!

Getting to the top of the first 7 mile climb was nice. Coolest thing, bagpiper at the top.

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There’s Nothing Better Than Bagpipes. Nothing.

Coming down the mountain provided a much needed break. I used to think that going down hills was harder than going up them, but that perspective changed long ago. I was flying down the hill, and I kept hearing people complain about the down hills.

I actually had to be reminded to slow down.

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Easy, Speed Racer

That first 7 mile climb was the biggest hill we ran, but it was far from the last. We kept going up and down for the entire race, which sucked, but there were some awesome views and gorgeous neighborhoods that we got to experience.

Looking Down on Roanoke

Looking Down on Roanoke

And since the hills never stopped coming, there was no shame and stopping or walking on occasion. No matter what the signs say.

So I Stopped. Do Something.

So I Stopped. Do Something.

Not a PR, But Still a Great Race

Going into the race, I knew that a new PR was out of the question. My A goal for the race was to be sub-4:30. A more realistic goal was to be sub-5:00, and I crossed the finish line at 4:52:10.

Not too shabby.

In Race Commentary

Looking back on the race, I’m really glad I took the trip north and ran the race. I got to meet some of my cool twitter friends in person, and knocked another state off of the list.

But during the race, I wasn’t quite as excited about what was going on. Check it out for yourself.

Did You Run the Blue Ridge Marathon This Year? How Did You Do?

If You Didn’t Run It, What Do You Think About Running a Marathon in the Mountains?