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Morning Runner

Quick Tip: How to Become an Early Morning Runner


We are all busy.

home-from-work

Aint that the truth…

There’s no question about that. But if we are trying to maintain consistency in our training, which really is the key to improving and reaching our running goals, we have to regularly be able to find time to run amid the craziness of life.

For me, the biggest key to my consistency in training has been becoming an early morning runner.

It wasn’t something that I really wanted to do, but it was the best option for me.

Because let’s be honest, if you wait to run until after work, there is a whole host of things that can screw your run up (family, work, traffic, etc.).

But if you get up at 4:30, take the dogs out real quick, and meet your running group at 5:15, you rarely run into a problem.

Funny how “life” isn’t even awake enough to screw up your run if you go early… Read more

J Law

Quick Tip: Advice for New Runners


Why would I waste my time writing a post and recording a quick tip offering advice for new runners?

I mean, running is pretty simple, right?

Put on a pair of shoes, any shoe will do, and then just go run.

It’s really that simple, right?

J Law

Sure….

There is a whole lot more to running than meets the eye, just like Optimus Prime.

So here are 6 pieces of advice for new runners to help them avoid some of the same mistakes that I made when I started running.

Some Advice for New Runners

Read more

Trouble Breathing During Winter Runs?

For some runners, breathing during winter runs can vary from difficult to downright painful.

The reason for this is simple: breathing the cold and dry winter air can cause bronchial spasms in your lungs which is the same thing that happens to asthmatics when they have an asthma attack.

And these cold weather breathing difficulties can strike anyone, even if you’ve never had asthma symptoms before.

What’s the best way to prevent these “asthma attacks” that can flare up while breathing during winter runs?

That’s the subject of today’s video.

A Runners Guide to Treating Tendonitis (with Video)

For runners, tendonitis can be one of those annoyances that never really goes away.

Too often treating tendonitis for runners feels like you’re playing with a yo-yo; the symptoms are gone and now the symptoms are back. And repeat. And repeat again.

But it doesn’t have to be like that. Treating tendonitis, and making sure it stays gone, is doable but it requires a little patience and proactivity on the part of the runner.

Admittedly, we runners tend to be low on patience when it comes to dealing with injuries, so perhaps that is where the problem lies.

In any event, in this video I’ll give you the “secrets” to treating tendonitis and preventing it from flaring back up, but it’s up to you to follow the advice.

Click here if you missed last week’s video about the causes and signs/symptoms of tendonitis.

Have You Ever Had to Deal with Tendonitis Before? What Kind and How Long Did You Battle It?

Traveling After a Race

Traveling After a Race? Three Tips to Make Your Trip More Comfortable

When I put together Friday’s quick tip about the issues a runner faces when making a long trip right before the race, I was planning on today’s post being the natural follow up–things to do when you’re traveling after a race, either by car or by plane.

Traveling After a Race

Traveling After a Race?

I’m still going to do that post today, but it’s not nearly as topical as I’d planned.

(If you’re not following me on Social Media, you may have missed the announcement that I wasn’t able to make it out to California to speak and run the Running with the Bears marathon. I’ll share the details of the disappointment later this week.)

So instead of dealing with the post-marathon aches and pains I was expecting to face today, I’m writing this post based on past experience.

Jumping in a plane less than 8 hours after running 26.2 is something I’ve done before (twice, actually), and I’ve also taken an 8+ hour car ride right after a race.

So if you’re facing a trip shortly after a half/full marathon finish, here are a few things you can do to make your trip home as comfortable as possible.  Read more